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Old Baptist Cemetery
 
Hannibal, Missouri
                   

              

 It sits quietly along the road, a little forgotten in today's world. People drive by it everyday, but seldom does anyone stop to visit. Stones are dotted around the area, but many graves lie unmarked, their residents a very distant memory. Do the inhabitants of this location feel the pain of being forgotten? Do they wish someone would take the time to stop and say Hi just once during their busy lives? And do they ever venture out of this area, looking for some company during the long days and cold nights? We will never know the answers to these questions, but we want them to know that they will always be remembered. It was to this cemetery that members of Il-Mo recently traveled. To walk amongst the stones, to take pictures of what still remains, and to try to reassure the residents that, in this small way, they will always be remembered. It is to this cemetery, and these residents, that we dedicate this page.

 
To learn about Mark Twain and to read his novels, please visit your public library.
To learn what Hannibal, Missouri have to offer, please visit:   Hannibal Missouri
To read some of the quotations and newspaper articles regarding Mark Twain, please visit:  Mark Twain
         
 
 
These words were written by one of the most famous persons ever associated with Hannibal, Mark Twain.
Mark Twain wrote many 
novels about life along the Mississippi, including
The Adventures  Of
Tom Sawyer. Tom and 
Huck had many adventures, including in this cemetery, hiding behind the stones.
 
 
 
Many of the stones are
cracked and decaying, being very hard to read any inscription. This one has a death date that is unreadable.
 
 
Unlike Tom and Huck,
who were usually up to
mischief, Michael walks
around attempting to hear what the residents of this cemetery might have to say.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Father Pete Brown, died March 23, 1916. Etched in concrete, this stone has weathered the seasons fairly well. We do not know if there is other family buried near him.
 
 
The stone is broken, and the letters are starting to fade. But research has determined the lady
buried here as Melvina Black, who died
November 30, 1926.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
It is almost like these trees are the guardian of this stone, flanking it on either side.
 
 
Bennie McDowell, who
died in 1864. The stone is starting to sink into the earth and is becoming hard to read.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Another stone, showing the marks of time. Whether from the elements or vandals, we have no clue. But appreciate that someone has, at least, placed the pieces close together.
 
 
Here lies J. H. C. We
doubt he is actually buried in the tree, more likely someone placed the stone there when the tree rotted away.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Michael and James search for stones among the leaves and other debris found at the cemetery.
 
 
 
Another example of a
name etched in concrete.
But this one is much harder to read. We think the stone, at one time, was upright, but now through the passage of the seasons, has fallen over to quietly rest here.
 
 
Obviously, at one time this was a family plot, but now all that remains are some broken stones and the border.








 
 
 
 
 
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